Vice President

As Vice President, Debora plays an essential role on the company’s executive team by collaborating around new markets, and bringing a customer-centric and pragmatic approach to achieving corporate and customer goals. She is responsible for building out a robust team of legal and technology experts in the eastern US, driving forward partnerships focused on delighting clients, and expanding the company’s brand through thought leadership events and new relationships. Debora’s background as a litigator and buyer, as well as her vast client-facing and operational experience will enable Lighthouse to provide the high-caliber, consultative client experience, the company is known for.

Debora has been with Lighthouse since 2009 and has made a significant impact on the company’s growth and business strategy during her tenure. With a background in litigation from practicing at law firms in both Washington D.C and Washington State, her expertise and deep understanding of complex ediscovery matters enabled her to create a resonating brand and architect the innovative products and services that keep Lighthouse at the forefront of the ediscovery market. She led the execution and implementation of the company’s rebranding in 2012 and developed the marketing department from the ground up. In addition, she has been instrumental in spearheading the company’s strategic technology partnerships, driving the formation of Lighthouse’s product strategy, and the evolution of Lighthouse’s SmartSeries. She also instituted and continues to maintain a client advisory board to ensure strong alignment with market demands. Finally, in 2015, Debora lead the company’s expansion to the eastern seaboard by managing the development the New York office and team, as well as expanding upon the company’s current set of services and clientele.

Prior to joining Lighthouse, Debora was a Complex Commercial Litigation Associate at Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP in Washington, D.C. where she worked on matters such as the WorldCom and Enron bankruptcies. Her practice also included multi-million-dollar commercial and securities litigation, and internal investigations. While at Weil, Debora was recognized three times for her dedication to pro bono service. Debora also practiced as a litigation Associate at McNaul Ebel Nawrot & Helgren PLLC. Her practice included commercial, employment, and securities litigation, as well as legal malpractice defense.

Debora received a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Washington where she graduated magna cum laude. She received her law degree from The George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C. She is admitted to practice law in New York State, the District of Columbia (inactive membership), and Washington State. Debora is Level II Pragmatic Marketing Certified. Debora is actively involved in the legal community as the former Director of Women in eDiscovery, as a mentor with Mother Attorneys Mentoring Association of Seattle, as an Advisory Board Member for the Organization of Legal Professionals, as the former Chair of the Association of Corporate Counsel (ACC)'s New to In-House Committee, and as a former board member of the Washington Women Lawyers (WWL). Debora was also recognized for her contribution to the ACC and was named 2012 WWL Board Member of the Year. Debora is a frequent speaker on eDiscovery strategy, a former instructor for the Organization of Legal Professionals, and a regular Lighthouse blog contributor.

Social Media: Corporate Friend or Corporate Foe?

Published Fri, November 14, 2014 by Debora Motyka Jones, Esq.

At a recent event of ediscovery professionals, the topic of social media came up. A corporate representative recounted how employee use of social media kept him up at night because it raised so many ediscovery issues. That stimulated some good discussion about whether social media is a good thing or bad thing for your company. The answer? Well, it depends – a frustratingly middle-of-the-road answer, I know, but it’s the truth.

LegalTech 2014: A Benchmarking Summary

Published Mon, February 17, 2014 by Debora Motyka Jones, Esq.

In case you missed LegalTech this year, I wanted to take a moment to share some key takeaways to help you benchmark against your peers and fill you in on what you missed. While Information Governance, CyberSecurity, and Big Data/Data Analytics were key themes that were carried across many of the presentations and the exhibit hall, we all know that these trends tend to be focused on the future. The top three items that I found most corporations were actually focused on today included:

LegalTech 101 - Taming the Beast

Published Thu, January 09, 2014 by Debora Motyka Jones, Esq.

LegalTech is the largest gathering of varied ediscovery professionals in the US, providing hand-on practical information for improving law practice management. For those of you still on the fence about attending, it is well worth the investment. If any part of your job involves vetting ediscovery or information management tools, vetting providers in those areas, understanding what others are doing in ediscovery, or understanding the legal/judicial landscape around ediscovery, you will find the event valuable. There is a packed agenda of...

Being a Smart Buyer - Top Questions for Evaluating the Trifecta of People, Process and Technology

Published Mon, January 06, 2014 by Debora Motyka Jones, Esq.

When I’m out in the field talking to buyers of services, I constantly hear about the trifecta of ediscovery provider perfection: good people, good process, and good technology. The people need to be knowledgeable about ediscovery but also able to persuade lawyers and technologists on the best course of action without affecting trial strategy or drastically increasing costs. The process needs to be sound and repeatable, a challenge in an industry with very few standards. The technology needs to be fast, and trusted, yet flexible and able to...

Technology Assisted Review - A Key Change to Your Review Rules

Published Mon, December 16, 2013 by Debora Motyka Jones, Esq.

Many people think of the training rounds of Technology Assisted Review as very similar to linear review. After all, you’re coding documents one-by-one, just as you are in the linear review. Why shouldn’t the same rules apply? Well, the implications of the training mean some of those rules can get you into trouble later on. There are three key differences between training rounds and linear review that you should consider. First, your decisions are amplified across thousands of other documents. Second, you are playing the role of teacher, and...

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